SESSION 3: METRICS

June 19 - 30, 2018

 

Artists in Residence: Ho-Wan-Ut "Haila" Old Peter, John Torreano
Craftspersons in Residence: Ben Edols, Dante Marioni

 

Session 3

BAG O’ TRICKS

Glassblowing, Hot Sculpting, Assembly, Cane, Murrini

This course will focus on multiple glassworking techniques, from classical to cutting edge. Students will experience traditional and non-traditional glassblowing and hot-sculpting processes including cane, murrini, mold blowing, blown and solid sculpting, large-scale work, graal blanks, using the hot torch and garage and much more. Multiple color applications will be demonstrated daily. There will be a subtheme of contemporary glass history and Pilchuck’s role within it that is also covered in class. Teamwork and collaboration will be encouraged. Come with an open mind and it will be blown.

A / INTERMEDIATE

 

JOHN MILLER

John Miller began working with glass in 1987 and later earned an MFA in sculpture at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Currently, Miller is an associate professor and head of the glass department at Illinois State University in Bloomington-Normal. He exhibits internationally and frequently tours the country lecturing and demonstrating with hot glass. Although he has experimented with many different techniques and materials, Miller’s focus is blown and hotworked glass sculpture.

 

Session 3

COLORING IN THE FUNDAMENTALS

Glassblowing, Design, Color

In this course, students will focus on the fundamentals of glassblowing, delving into a deeper understanding of form and color application. Starting simple, projects will grow in complexity as students develop and grow in skill. Working through functional forms such as cylinders, bowls, bottles and cones, students will develop and fine-tune techniques and foundations that they will be able to build on in the future. Demonstrations from instructors and visiting artists will help students to deepen their understanding of form, color and technique.

B / ALL LEVELS

 

LEWIS BATCHELAR
MADELINE PROWD

Lewis Batchelar and Madeline Prowd are based in Adelaide, Australia. Batchelar graduated from Wanganui Glass School, New Zealand, in 2012 before relocating to Australia for the associate training program at JamFactory. Lewis was a finalist/exhibitor in Fuse Glass Prize, and the Young Glass Prize. Prowd graduated from ANU in 2009 before relocating for the program at JamFactory. Prowd received the Saxe award from Pilchuck Glass School in 2015.

 

Session 3

THE GLASS ELECTRIC: ELECTROFORMING, CIRCUITS & SENSORS

Glassblowing, Hot Casting, Electroforming, Electronics, Mixed Media, 3-D Printing

Expand your glass canvas with electroformed copper and electronic sensors for sculptural installations. Students will digitally prepare images and glasswork for sand carving and plating with copper, gold and silver. Combining glass and metal electrically, we will create electronic circuits for switches and motors, and for proximity and sound sensing. Students will have hot shop and 3-D print access to create glass and electric forms through hot sculpting and electrically conductive 3-D printing. Laptops required.

A / ALL LEVELS

 

VICTORIA BRADBURY

MARK HURSTY

Dr. Victoria Bradbury’s installations have re-presented historic witch trials by creating systems of guilt and innocence through code-mediated electronics and sensors. She has led art hacking events internationally and is assistant professor of new media at UNC Asheville. Mark Hursty applies digital manufacture and process abstraction to molten glass and installation works. He is a Fulbright Fellow who received his PhD from National Glass Centre at University of Sunderland, and is a lecturer at UNC Asheville.

 

Session 3

SO YOU WANT TO MAKE TAMALES

Flameworking, Lathe, Design

From philosophy to concept to design we will focus on the importance of preparation, research and thought. We will be spending as much (or more) time off the torch as on, reinforcing a different approach. Instructors will bounce back and forth between lathe and bench techniques to demonstrate the power of both. Daily demos, nightly group discussions and critiques will make this class a different beast than you may be used to. Be ready to think, watch and question. You will leave with an understanding of the process and material that few possess in modern flameworking.

A / INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED

 

MICAH EVANS
STEPHAN PEIRCE

Micah Evans is a glass artist originally from Washington State, now based in Austin, Texas. Recently, Evans finished a three-year residency in glass at Penland School of Crafts developing the two sides of his work, a balance of personal sculpture and traditional craft objects. Stephan Peirce is a self-taught flameworker and lathe worker based in Austin, Texas. For the past five years he has focused mainly on lathe work and using the flexibility of his skill set at the bench to bring color and traditional hand skills to objects made on the lathe.

 

Session 3

DIGITAL CLAYGROUND 2.0

Mold Blowing, Kilncasting, 3-D Scanning, Modeling, Printing

Using the 3-D Potterbot clay printer and BotLab, this course will introduce students to processes of creating glasswork through digital modeling and materials exploration. Projects will include 3-D scanning, basic modeling in Rhino and other software, as well as printing in clay and PLA. Resulting forms will prompt investigations in the Hot Shop and Kiln Studio. Students can use a trial version of Rhino software and will receive a discount if they choose to purchase it. A laptop is required.

B / ALL LEVELS

 

REBECCA ARDAY
BARRAK DARWEESH
PHIRAK SUON

Rebecca Arday is an artist/educator living in Rochester, New York. Her artwork is rooted in the poetic ability of objects and utilizes a variety of traditional and emerging technologies. Barrak Darweesh is an architect/designer interested in design as research and physical storytelling through technology, computation and fabrication. Phirak Suon is a designer working in Seattle. He has a background in art, architecture and digital fabrication. His work explores the intersection between materials, digital and traditional handcraft.

 

Session 3

GLASSOGRAPHY

Writing, Conversation, Public Reading

This course is dedicated to making observations about glass through various writing experiences. Motivated to develop a broader conversation about the landscape of contemporary glass, students will examine the many fascinating nuances related to glass materiality, glass culture, our community and issues related to the field in general. Through short writing exercises, lectures, group activities, writing projects and public readings of our work, this course will serve as a means to convey information, exchange ideas and make insightful discoveries.

NO UTILITY FEE / ALL LEVELS

 

DAVID SCHNUCKEL

David Schnuckel’s work exhibits internationally and is in the permanent collections of GlazenHuis, Glasmuseet Ebeltoft, and Museum of American Glass. He has taught at Alfred University, Toyama Institute of Glass Art, Studio at Corning Museum of Glass and Penland School of Crafts.  As a writer, Schnuckel maintains a blog that examines his glass and teaching practice entitled David Schnuckel Uses His Words and is a contributor to GASnews. He is currently a lecturer of glass at Rochester Institute of Technology.